First Culture

Kara Walker Uses Paper Silhouettes To Portray Race And Gender Relations

Kara Walker Uses Paper Silhouettes To Portray Race And Gender Relations

Born in 1969 in Stockton, California, Kara Walker is an African American painter who became an instant sensation in 1994 when her unique work on silhouettes  appeared in a new-talent show at the Drawing Center in New York.

About this exhibition that kick-started her career, Biography says; It wasn’t just the theme of the piece that caught the attention of critics, but its form: black-paper silhouette figures against a white wall. An ever present reminder of the diversity of racial relations, a reminder of how one race is perceived to be the backdrop on which the other exists.

Walker’s work has experienced extensive criticism for being too grotesque, venturing too deeply into the theme of racial stereotypes and for through a rare form of art creating difficult conversations.

But her works stretch from being racially inclined to also tackling the problems of gender, society and women inclusion.

Find a few of our favorite Walker works below (this content may be graphic for some audiences);

 

 

 

 

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*All images belong to Kara Walker

 

 

 

 

 

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Caleb Somtochukwu Okereke

Caleb Somtochukwu Okereke

Senior Editor working out of East Africa.

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Kara Walker Uses Paper Silhouettes To Portray Race And Gender Relations

by Caleb Somtochukwu Okereke time to read: 1 min
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